Thursday, 30 May 2013

Aaron Wallis Golf Day June 21st 2013

I would like to make you aware of the Aaron Wallis Golf Tournament which is happening on Friday June 21st at The Bedford golf Club, Great Denham (on the outskirts of Bedford).  'The Bedford' is a really interesting and challenging course for both beginners and middle handicap golfers alike and easily accessible from all parts of the Home Counties.

Here at Aaron Wallis we thought it would be a good opportunity for clients to take time out of their busy schedules to enjoy a game of golf and to mix with other members of the business community in fun and informal surroundings regardless of their ability to hit the ball 250 yards or putt in from off the green!

The format of the day will be 18 holes of golf starting in the morning in groups of four people with prizes on offer such as the longest drive, nearest the pin, Stapleford winner, and as always, the winner of the wooden spoon which should give everybody a chance of winning a prize!

If you are a hiring manager of either finance or sales staff and would like to take a break from your busy week and mix with business colleagues in a relaxed and friendly way whilst getting some exercise too, then please contact Giles Phillips on 01908 886124 or email me on giles.phillips@aaronwallis. co.uk. Places will be limited to 32 entrants so please respond quickly to guarantee your place for what should be a great day’s golf.

I look forward to hearing from you shortly, Cheers!  Giles

 

Friday, 24 May 2013

10 Reasons for Employee Demotivation


Demotivation can be contagious; even one demotivated employee who walks around the work place spreading negative vibes can quickly work on demotivating others. The causes of motivational and behaviour problems in any workplace are familiar to most managers, but there is no such thing as a quick fix for most of these problems. Most problems evolve over time and can take a long time to fix so the best thing to do is prevent the cause before it becomes a problem.

10 of the most common reasons for employee demotivation, as well as methods to combat these issues can be seen below.

Favouritism – If a colleague or even a group of colleagues appear to be given special treatment it can be one of the most demotivating things an employee could experience. A good boss would keep the situation under control and curb favouritism before it gets out of hands. It is quite natural to have trusted employees in the work place but there should be a line between trusting an individual and showing favouritism.

Too much work – Employees can feel overloaded with a disproportionate chunk of work which can make them feel unable to perform their duties well and on time. Be realistic with assigning tasks, delegate an amount of work that is challenging but not overwhelming.

Lack of recognition and praise – An employee can feel unappreciated for his efforts. It doesn’t take a lot to make someone feel good about them, a simple thank you or even a work lunch could do wonders.

No progression – Even the best salesman can become demotivated quickly if they feel they are stuck in a dead end job. An employer should always try to be flexible and look for a solution, progression increase employee satisfaction and in turn productivity.

Poor leadership – Most reasons for demotivation of staff comes down to poor leadership. If your company is lacking leadership then set out to recruit employees with leadership skills, if not the next best thing is leadership training.

Lazy co-workers – Lazy co-workers who do not pull their weight and get favoured by management can be very demotivating. Set clear goals and create a rewards system for the employees that do put the effort in.

Lack of company benefits – It could be that a field sales rep has to pay their own petrol or doesn’t get access to a company car this could demotivate them. Be aware of what benefits will be more attractive to employees in different roles.

Micromanagement – Perhaps one of the biggest reasons for demotivation is micromanaging. Employees need to feel trusted and valued to succeed—and micromanaging communicates the opposite.

Job role not challenging enough – An employee may love the company and all their colleagues but if the role isn’t challenging enough it could demotivate them and make them look elsewhere. Employers need to keep employees on their toes, keep work challenging but not enough to make them feel over worked.

Not explaining your actions – The unknown for employees can demotivate them. Explaining the big management decisions will help employees understand your perspective and they will also respect you more for it.


Written by Liam Oakes

Liam is the Sales Recruitment Manager at Aaron Wallis and has been with the company for 5 years after having a career with the RAF; Liam has helped hundreds of Sales Professionals secure a new Sales role and ensures that Aaron Wallis runs smoothly.




Thursday, 16 May 2013

Excellent LinkedIn profile but should we rely on it?

Social media usage has increased significantly over the last few years and LinkedIn is a place where this is abundantly clear.
Originally the playground of the ‘white collar’ worker LinkedIn now proves itself to be an arena for factual but sometimes extravagant professional working profiles.
More and more employers will have accounts and build a network of contacts which are relevant to their world. On occasion potential hires will be scrutinised according to their credentials presented on the account but can this add to the ambiguity of accurate information?
When reviewing any profile it always pays to delve into the basics:
Does the individual have more than one account? (creating a varied presence online)
Academic records, can these be accounted for?
Length of time at previous companies and responsibilities (is this factual and accurate)
Whether you’re an advocate of the wonderful ‘endorsement’ system or not the more preferable gauge for credibility would be recommendations stating a clear testimonial from hopefully a relevant individual
More and more people are actively making their CV redundant and opting for the electronic link to their profile. In the past the validity of CV’s could sometimes be questionable and we should move forward with the times by being just as prudent with the digital version of the modern CV.
Written by Stephen Minney
Managing Consultant at SET Recruitment (A trading name of Aaron Wallis Recruitment and Training Ltd), Self Confessed Geeks who live with their commitment to technology

You can contact Stephen on 01908 764280 or stephen.minney@setrecruitment.co.uk

Tuesday, 14 May 2013

Top Tips on how to get a Job in Sales


It is well known the current climate isn’t what it used to be, however there are certain sectors that continue to grow. In sales, recruiters are continually looking for talent, it isn’t as easy as it used to be to find the right sales role but for individuals with the right skills and qualifications who are serious about their career, there are plenty of opportunities out there.
If you’re looking for one of these opportunities there are a number of things you can do to get you that perfect sales role.

Look for a job the same way you sell – It is surprising how many successful salespeople struggle to sell themselves in the same way as they sell their product or service. By approaching the process in the same way as you approach your sales, you will be more likely to achieve your ideal job.
Know what you want – What do you want to get out of your new job. Know what you want to sell; do you want to windows or advertising? Maybe you don’t think it matters but in the long run it will, you are going to care a great deal about what you are selling. You need to find a job where you can really engage with both the product and the selling process.

Don’t just email your CV – Always follow up your application with a phone call, it shows you’re willing to get on the phone and knock down doors. Your CV could be 1 of 100, if you follow it up you can be sure it will increase your job chances no end.
Prepare for an interview like it’s a sales call – Show energy in posture and in your verbal responses, make sure you know their business, their market and product lines/services well. With the Internet there is no excuse not knowing their business. And finally, make sure they know your skills and what you bring to the party.

Follow up after the interview – After the interview do you go away? Do you wait to hear about how it went? Make sure you follow up the interview straight away, one of the best things you can do after an interview is send a thank you email. How you go about pursuing a sales job is an excellent indication to a potential employer as to how you might behave after they hire you as a sales rep.

Written by Liam Oakes

Liam is the Candidate Manager at Aaron Wallis and has been with the company for 2 years after having a career with the RAF; Liam has helped hundreds of Sales Professionals secure a new Sales role and ensures that Aaron Wallis runs smoothly.